healthy weight loss that lasts

Whole Soy Story: The Dark Side of America’s Favorite Health Food

By on Jan 28, 2018 in 21st Century Nutrition, CANCER, HEALTH AND WELLNESS | 0 comments

By Kaayla T. Daniel
Issue 124: May/June 2004

Over the past decade, soy foods have become America’s favorite health food. Newspapers, magazines, and best-selling health writers have proclaimed the “joy of soy” and promoted the belief that soy food is the key to disease prevention and maximum longevity.

The possibility that an inexpensive plant food could prevent heart disease, fight cancer, fan away hot flashes, and build strong bodies in far more than 12 ways is seductive. The truth, unfortunately, is far more complex. Soy foods come in a variety of forms, including many heavily processed modern products. Even good forms of soy foods must be eaten sparingly-the way they have been eaten traditionally in Asia. Most important, many respected scientists have issued warnings stating that the possible benefits of eating soy should be weighed against the proven risks. Indeed, thousands of studies link soy to malnutrition, digestive distress, immune-system breakdown, thyroid dysfunction, cognitive decline, reproductive disorders and infertility-even cancer and heart disease.

Americans rarely hear anything negative about soy. Thanks to the shrewd public relations campaigns waged by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), Protein Technologies International (PTI), the American Soybean Association, and other soy interests, as well as the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) 1999 approval of the health claim that soy protein lowers cholesterol, soy maintains a “healthy” image.

This article is written for parents who need to know the risks of feeding soy formula to infants, or soy milk and other soy foods to growing children. It’s designed for prospective mothers and fathers who need to know the links between soy foods, infertility, and birth defects. Finally, it will serve anyone considering soy as a preventive for menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, or other ills.

Source: Mothering Magazine

Dr. Wegmann’s Thoughts:

 Many patients in my office ask about soy products. This post is designed to help uncover some of the things many people are not aware of. Here is some of the research on soy. A 2001 literature review suggested that women with current or past breast cancer should be aware of the risks of potential tumor growth when taking soy products, based on the effect of phytoestrogens to promote breast cancer cell growth in animals. A study found high consumption of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are found in most types of vegetable oil including soybean oil, may increase the likelihood that postmenopausal women will develop breast cancer. The most serious problem with soy may be its use in infant formulas. “The amount of phytoestrogens that are in a day’s worth of soy infant formula equals 5 birth control pills,” says Mary G. Enig, Ph.D., president of the Maryland Nutritionists Association. She and other nutrition experts believe that infant exposure to high amounts of phytoestrogens is associated with early puberty in girls and retarded physical maturation in boys. A study reported in the British medical journal Lancet found that the “daily exposure of infants to isoflavones in soy infant-formulas is 6-11 fold higher on a bodyweight basis than the dose that has hormonal effects in adults consuming soy foods.” (A dose, equivalent to two glasses of soy milk per day, that was enough to change menstrual patterns in women.) In the blood of infants tested, concentrations of isoflavones were 13000-22000 times higher than natural estrogen concentrations in early life. I am currently looking at a carton of soy milk which clearly states “this soymilk is made from soybeans that were not genetically modified”.This does not make soy good for you. Is there such a thing as safe soy? To produce soy milk, the beans are first soaked in an alkaline solution, then heated to about 115 degrees C in order to remove as much of the trypsin inhibitors as possible. Fallon says this method destroys most, but not all of the anti-nutrients, however it has the “unhappy side effect of so denaturing the proteins that they become very difficult to digest and much reduced in effectiveness.” Furthermore, phytates remain in soy milk to block the uptake of essential minerals. Only a long period of fermentation will significantly reduce the phytate content of soybeans, as well as the trypsin inhibitors that interfere with enzymes and amino acids. Therefore, fermented soy products such as tempeh and miso (not tofu) provide nourishment that is easily assimilated. I recommend removing as much dairy out of your diet as possible, the main reason is the inflammatory response the body has from digesting milk. Unfortunately soy is not a good supplement for dairy consumption. For our children, they were breastfed until almost a year, than we supplemented with goat’s milk. Today they do drink some dairy but very limited. We make a conscious effort to make water there main fluid intake for the day.

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